Seminars

The Women’s Studies Group 1558-1837 seminars take place during autumn and winter at the Foundling Museum, 40 Brunswick Square, London, WC1N 1AZ, on Saturdays (or occasionally on Sundays), 1-4pm.  Doors open at 12.30pm, and there is a break for tea, coffee and biscuits halfway through the session.  Seminars are free and open to the public though non-members will be asked to make a donation of £2 for refreshments. There are usually three speakers per seminar, and we start promptly so as to give time for supportive feedback and discussion from members.

The WSG invites papers formal and informal, as well as works-in-progress, on any topic related to early modern and long eighteenth-century women’s and gender studies, be it literature, medicine, art, music, theatre, religion, economics, sexuality, and so on.  Early career and independent scholars are particularly welcome.  We put out a call for papers every February through August on sites like bsecs.org.uk, but if you would like to be considered as a speaker please contact the Seminars Organiser, Carolyn Williams.

Non-member attendees including speakers are strongly encouraged to join WSG, and can do so here.

Current programme: 

SATURDAY September 23, 2017. Chair: Sara Read
Charmian Mansell: Female servants in the early modern community: space, place and identity.
Christina Paine: Crises of Celebrity (on Angelica Catalani and her experience as a highly successful female immigrant singer in London, between 1806 and 1814).
Emma Clery: Jane Austen on Money.

SATURDAY 25 November, 2017. Chair: Lois Chaber
Eva-Maria Lauenstein: ‘Within these tombes enclos’d’: delineating Renaissance love in Mary Sidney Herbert’s Antonius.
Mihoko Suzuki: Political writing beyond borders: Charlotte Stanley and Margaret Cavendish.
Valerie G. Derbyshire: Words and pictures: Charlotte Smith (1749-1806) and the works of the artists of her day.

SUNDAY 14 January, 2018. Chair: Angela Escott
Maryann Feola: Aphra Behn and the shaping of an imagined Naples.
Karen Lipsedge: Reading women and the eighteenth-century home.
Sarah Burdett: From bloodthirsty Amazon to ‘Desp’rate Mother’: Sarah Yates’s re-invention of Queen Margaret of Anjou on the 1790s London stage.

SUNDAY 11 March, 2018 (This is a ‘how-to’ session that also involves a measure of ‘work in progress’: the techniques under discussion are life writing, the use of legal documents, and audio research).   Chair: Angela Escott
Valerie Schutte: Princess, Duchess, Queen: Mary Tudor as represented in the long eighteenth century.
Cheryll Duncan: Music, women and the law: the challenges and rewards of legal documents.
Catriona Cooper: Listening to the Commons: the sounds of debate and the experience of women in Parliament c.1800.

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